TOP 10 REASONS FOR CHECKLIST AUTOMATION

1. Less paper. Paper checklists usually must be kept for at least seven years for state and federal audits. When the bosses see a room full of old paper, they see dollar signs.

2. Reduced exposure. Even worse, that paper could be a ticking time bomb because no one is sure of what is really in those records. Do they expose the department to an unfavorable ISO audit? Might a lawyer find some damning evidence in there that the chief never knew about?

3. Accountability: Nothing falls between the cracks. It’s very hard to know everything that goes on day-to-day at the station, and that’s a scary thought. The people releasing the funding will want to know that reliable procedures are being diligently followed, and that identified problems are being promptly addressed.

4. Acceptance: The team will love it. Unlike many computer systems imposed on the workforce in the past, this one is actually easier to use – and even fun. It’s touch screen based and runs on a tablet or cell phone.  

5. Lawsuit defense. In the dangerous world of first responders people get injured and sometimes die. Regardless of intentions and effort, this can draw lawsuits. Vital to the department’s defense is to show that there was no contributory negligence – that is that all reasonable precautions were taken and documented. This results in smaller awards.

6. Faster turnaround on broken equipment and out-of-service vehicles. Given the demands of the typical 24/48 shift and that almost 90% of all U.S. departments employ volunteers, it can often take days or even weeks to assign follow up work once a problem has been identified.  Station Check reduces that to minutes or hours, resulting in more equipment being ready at any given point with fewer dollars spent.

7.  Identify problems before failure. This system provides trend data on wear and repair patterns that are very difficult to harvest using paper forms. This allows better preventative maintenance regimens and informs equipment purchase decisions.

8. More successful funding requests. With accurate reliable data – including no negative ISO audit results – the city, county, state and even federal funding sources will be more confident about sending money to your organization.

9. Professionalism and leadership. People want to work for well-run departments. It gives them pride and camaraderie. It fosters job security and the sense of upward mobility.  

10. Better serve the mission. This is the reason most people chose to become first responders – to serve the community by preventing injury, protecting property and saving lives. With Station Check, the bosses can be assured they are affordably providing the best service possible to the people they serve.

 

Station Check is the leader in checklist and workflow automation for emergency responders. Learn more here or let us know how we can assist you

The Case of the Runaway Tires

The Case of the Runaway Tires

The captain was perplexed. The field reported a runaway tire coming off trailer #17.  That trailer was used to haul around rescue boats to various emergency scenes in in the rivers and lakes that crisscrossed the region. 

While responding to a potential drowning, the tire had simply flown off its mount crashing right through the plate glass window of a local diner.  Fortunately, no one was hurt, but the tire missed hitting old John Harry by less than a foot. The town loved that old man. Aside from the human tragedy, it would have been an ugly lawsuit besides.

Station Check’s New Software Release Allows Integration with Most Popular Software Applications

Station Check’s New Software Release Allows  Integration with Most Popular Software Applications

SC-300X introduces advanced API integration, increased large department support, and universal device access

April 26, 2017 – Cleveland, OH – Station Check, the leader in automated equipment checks and asset management for fire departments, announced today at FDIC International the newest release of its software platform, SC-300X. SC-300X simplifies integration with existing software partners and runs intuitively on most any device that has internet access while better serving the needs of larger departments.

Station Check named by Plain Dealer's Tech Czar as "startup to watch"

Station Check named by Plain Dealer's Tech Czar as "startup to watch"

An excerpt from the Plain Dealer business page - Sunday February 19:

First-Responder Tech. An Akron-based tech company is creating engaging software that allows fire, police and EMS first responders to inspect and quickly repair their equipment before answering their next call.

StationCheck was launched in 2010 when entrepreneur Marling Engle had a client seeking a software platform that would allow them to create checklists at a fire station. 

What’s New? It All Fits on Your Phone…

What’s New? It All Fits on Your Phone…

Station Check recently introduced several major upgrades to its cloud-based software package for first responders.  To get a better understanding of this significant move, reporter David Montville recently met with Station Check’s president, Brian Sroub to discuss those software enhancements. 

MONTVILLE: I noticed you changed your software. Why?

SROUB:  We’re just continuing our mission to better serve our customers. Software is a living product. The best software companies are always finding ways to improve their product and make their customers happier.

Cats in a Tree and other Short Stories from the Field...

Cats in a Tree and other Short Stories from the Field...

We’re a rural fire department. We’ve all had our share of calls for rescuing a cat stuck in the tree, but our station seems to have taken it to the next level. Maybe everyone has seen these things, but in the last few years, we’ve also been called to save a dog whose head got stuck in a hole in a big old oak.  We got called to save a very large woman who got stuck in mud pool in her back yard.  We also pulled a few parachuters out of trees … and we even got called to pull out someone stuck on their toilet.  Boy oh boy, there are a lot of folks getting’ stuck out there these days!

Clean Those Tires!

Clean Those Tires!

Many times when fire departments automate their paper checklists, they find some of the procedures they have been following haven’t been questioned in years.

A case in point comes from a certain Northern Ohio firehouse.

They had a rule stating that every evening, all the vehicles in the station had to be driven out onto the driveway so they could thoroughly wash down the tires.

The crew performed this tedious task dutifully every night.

You Need to Know, Before the ISO

You Need to Know, Before the ISO

Carl was just over a year into his job as a chief of a seven-station department located in a southeastern state of the US. His department was a fire and rescue unit that fought about 50 significant fires each year and responded to over 2,000 EMS incidents.  The department had experienced 11 civilian fatalities in that year and 3 fire fighter injuries, but by NFPA stats this was below average, and Carl was proud of the performance of his crew.

So when the ISO (Insurance Services Office) inspector showed up at Carl’s station one morning in June, he wasn’t overly concerned. Before he had become chief, Carl had seen the ISO guys come in from time to time. You never knew exactly what they would be asking for during an inspection.

Checklists: Silly, Obvious … and Life Saving

Checklists: Silly, Obvious … and Life Saving

Review of The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande

 “It seems silly to make checklists for something that is so obvious.”

In his eye-opening book, The Checklist Manifesto, author Atul Gawande documented this sentiment in industry after industry – among doctors, nurses, firefighters, police, lawyers, financial managers, pilots, EMS teams, and sometimes even our military. But when checklists are employed and adhered to, the results are astounding.

Checklist Manifesto digs into why this process is so important.

Fight Fire with Technology

Fight Fire with Technology

Most everything burns, and when it does, disaster can ensue. Historically, there have been some big ones: Rome nearly burned to the ground. The London burnings were a catastrophe, and last century the Great Chicago Fire destroyed many homes and businesses.

Firefighter technology has come a long way. We now have dedicated fire brigades, but when they got started a few hundred years ago, they were mostly volunteers, and unlike today, those volunteers were unpaid, untrained civilians carrying around buckets of water.